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About Damien

Damien McCusker, Manager of Arpi's residential service division, has been working in the HVAC industry for 18 years and has hands-on experience in new home installations, furnace and air conditioner replacements, sales and residential service. He spends most of his spare time sharing his passion for soccer with his kids and enjoys watching them at soccer practice and games.

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The Basics of Ventilating a Bathroom

Damien McCusker

Are your bathrooms ventilated? And if so, are they ventilated properly to the outdoors? If you answer no to either of these questions, it's time to take a look at why bathroom ventilation should be on your list of home upgrades.

What Does Bathroom-Exhaust Ventilation Do?

Ventilation in the bathroom isn't just about exhausting stale air, but more importantly, it should be removing moisture. Bathrooms are where most moisture is generated in the home, and in many cases, they are not ventilated at all. Some systems simply send moisture up into the attic or the ceiling joists, rather than outdoors.

Further, some bathroom ventilation systems that are exhausted to the outdoors are not used properly. To exhaust air sufficiently, the ventilation should be run for a good hour after someone showers to adequately exhaust the moisture. Otherwise, moisture can collect in corners, behind walls and tile work, behind baseboards, and in the shower, providing conditions that encourage the growth of mold, mildew, and fungus. This moisture can also be a source of damp, musty smells.

Another common problem with existing bathroom-ventilation systems is that they aren't sized properly for the bathroom, so they don't do a good job of removing moisture.

Today's Ventilation Systems

If your bathroom has a moisture problem, then you should look into installing a new system or upgrading your current one. When you talk to a consultant, make sure he or she understands about proper sizing of the system for the bathroom.

You'll also need to ask about ducting the system to the outdoors. If your home already has the ductwork for bathroom ventilation, make sure it is adequate to work with your new system, that it is in good working order, and that it is ducted to the outdoors.

Another feature to look into is noise level. Few homeowners find the loud level of noise produced by older exhaust-ventilation systems acceptable. The good news? Much quieter systems are now available that don't cost that much more than the louder models.

For more on bathroom ventilation, contact Arpi's Industries. We serve Calgary and the surrounding area.

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