About Damien

Damien McCusker, Manager of Arpi's residential service division, has been working in the HVAC industry for 16 years and has hands-on experience in new home installations, furnace and air conditioner replacements, sales and residential service. He spends most of his spare time being an UBER driver, driving his kids to soccer practice and games.

Control Pollutants in Your Household

Phil Laprairie

Control Pollutants in Your HouseholdIf you're concerned about air pollution and seek refuge inside your home from dirty air, we have some troubling news. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has found that indoor air is likely to be two to five times dirtier than outdoor air. This is a significant public health threat that also can erode quality of life.

Indoor air is so vulnerable to pollutants mainly because of modern home construction that stresses airtightness as a way to save energy. Unless there's an effective way to exchange indoor air with outdoor air, pollutants tends to build up inside a house, threatening the health and well-being of occupants. The good news is that you can take several steps to reduce indoor pollution. Try the following:

Reduce sources of indoor pollution — Avoid products that contain VOCs (volatile organic compounds). These can be anything ranging from household cleaning products to air fresheners to furniture and rugs or carpets. Store chemical products in a safe place with the lids tightly closed. Find natural substitutes for products containing VOCs.

Control indoor humidity — If your household air is too moist or too dry, it can become a welcoming environment for microorganic pollutants such as bacteria, mold and mildew. Eliminate sources of interior moisture and use a whole-house humidifier in the winter and dehumidifier in the summer.

Improve ventilation — This can mean something as simple as opening windows during mild weather and using exhaust fans in bathrooms and the kitchen, or more aggressive solutions such as investing in high-tech balanced ventilation provided by Heat or Energy Recovery Ventilator systems (HRVs or ERVs).

Effective air filtration — Invest in a mid- to high-efficiency filter for your HVAC system. This will remove contaminants as the air circulates in your home. Inspect and change regularly.

Clean the air — A whole-house air-purifying system, which uses a variety of air-cleaning strategies, will work with your forced-air HVAC system to remove the vast majority of pollutants from indoor air.

For more advice on improving the air quality in your Calgary area home, please contact us at Arpi's Industries.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in Calgary, Alberta about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide.

Credit/Copyright Attribution: “Jana Guothova/Shutterstock”

Blog Categories: 

Add new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Call Us Today: 403-236-2444