About Damien

Damien McCusker, Manager of Arpi's residential service division, has been working in the HVAC industry for 16 years and has hands-on experience in new home installations, furnace and air conditioner replacements, sales and residential service. He spends most of his spare time being an UBER driver, driving his kids to soccer practice and games.

Weigh The Pros And Cons Of Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Phil Laprairie

Carbon monoxide (CO) dangers are a reality, and homeowners would be remiss not to take action against them. Carbon monoxide stems from the combustion process, which exists in nearly every home from gas stoves, chimneys, fireplaces, hot water heaters and so forth. Having this equipment inspected every year will cut down on the chances of a problem. But if a problem does occur, you want to have the peace of mind that carbon monoxide detectors provide.

You can use these questions to weigh the pros and cons of carbon monoxide detectors as you comparison shop:

What type of sensor do I need?
Because high and low levels of exposure to CO are dangerous, you want a detector that will alert you to high levels and track low levels over time.

There are three basic sensor applications in detectors. Metal-oxide semi-conduction (MOS) models create a chemical reaction between CO and oxide. Biomimetic units sound an alarm when CO mixes with a special coating within the detector. Both types read high levels of CO well.

Electrochemical systems use a chemical reaction that sends an electrical current to sound a warning. These units are ideal because they give accurate reads of high levels and also store low levels in their memory.

When do I have to replace it?
Battery-operated systems generally last from two to three years, and you would have to remember to change the batteries every year for them to continuously read CO levels. Hard-wired systems can last for 10 years and don’t require battery changes, but installation locations are limited because they have to be wired into your existing electrical design.

Is it certified?
Look for the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) logo on carbon monoxide detectors. You’ll know that the detectors have passed the testing standards for safety and accuracy.

To keep carbon monoxide under wraps, use a detector and have any combustion equipment inspected yearly by a professional. Arpi’s is an industry leader in establishing safe home conditions. Our professionals can help you select a CO detector. Call us with your questions.

Our goal is to help educate our customers about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information, click here to download our free Home Comfort Resource guide.

 

Arpi’s services Calgary, Alberta. To get started, check out our website or see our special offers.

Blog Categories: 

Add new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Call Us Today: 403-236-2444